Last update:
May 7, 2016
Rajab 30, 1437

Hammams (Turkish Baths) in Tripoli Lebanon

Tripoli > History > Monuments > Hammams

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AlAbed Hammam

Tripoli's only functioning hammam is Hammam AlAbed. It was mentioned in Nabulsi's accounts of his visit to Tripoli in the early 18th century, this suggests that the bath was probably built at the end of the 17th century. It is present at the Roumanneh district at the Sayyagheen Bazaar. It occupies a 500 m2 area and it has the typical pierced domes of Mamluke and Ottoman Era public baths. The interior, with its cushions, central fountain and traditional fittings, is a living museum. This monument requires 45,000$ to restore it to its original status.




AlAzem Hammam

Known as Hammam AlAteek, Hammam AlAzem is situated in ElMina below the arch of the Kabir Ali Mosque. This bath was constructed by Ibrahim Pasha AlAzem, governor of Tripoli, during the Ottoman period in year 1136 H./1723 CE.


AlJadeed Hammam

Built around 1723-1730 CE by Ibrahim Pasha elAzem (the Ottoman governor of the city) on the remainings of a Mameluke construction, and called the "New Bath," this is by far the largest hammam in the city of Tripoli since it occupies 600 m2. Although it has not been in operation since the 1970's, its faded grandeur still stirs the imagination. AlJadeed Hammam is located in the Haddadeen district and is at present unused. This monument requires about 82,000$ to restore it to its original status.


Inner view from AlJadeed (New) Hammam.

AlJadeed Hammam in the late 1960's.





AlNouri Hammam


Present at the vicinity of the Mansouri Great Mosque at the Nouri district, Hammam elNouri was built by the Prince Sonjor Bin Abdulah el-Nouri at 1310 CE. The hammam follows the Mameluke style and it occupies 545 m2. However, it differs from Izzedeen Hammam in that the dressing room and the tepidarium are built on a smaller scale. On the other hand, the hot water steam hall is large and is surrounded by a series of private bathing alcoves. The interior is decorated with multicolored marble pavement, basins and fountains and from the exterior one can get a view of its cluster of domes perforated with light holes with protruding blue and green glass roundels. At present, AlNouri Hammam is not used and needs an urgent maintainance. This monument requires about 110,000$ to restore its function.


Izzeddeen Hammam

This is a public bathing-house located at the Hadeed district and occupying an area of 745 m2 area. Izzeddeen Hammam was constructed in years 1295-1299 CE/694-698 Hejirah and it was commissioned by the city's Mamluke Governor "Izzeldeen Aybak AlMawsili". The Governor (d. 1298 CE), is buried in a mausoleum besides the Hammam.

In building Izzeddeen Hammam, artifacts remaining from a Crusader church and hospice of Saint Jacob were used. The external front portal is decorated with an inscribed fragment between two Saint James shells. The name of St. Jacob is clearly indicated (SCStACOBOS).

The inner gate of Izzeddeen Hammam hammam caries an arch that includes series of alternate colored-stones with some simple decoratif motifs below. The gate is decorated on top with a picture of a small lamb who's head is surrounded by an icon. The lamb symbols the "Holly Paschal Lamb" slaughtered by Christians during Easter. On the right and left sides of the lamb there are two rounded-flower motifs. Next to the right-sided flower stands a latin inscription.

Izzeddeen Hammam was in continual use until it was badly damaged during Lebanon's war. The Hammam was recently restored by the Lebanese Ministry of Culture and it is open for visitors during weekdays.

The External Portal of Izzeddeen Hammam

The External Portal of Izzeddeen Hammam Showing an Inscribed Fragment (SCStACOBOS) between two Saint James Shells.

The Inner Gate of Izzeddeen Hammam
The Inner Gate of Izzeddeen Hammam. Left: Photo taken in the 1970s. Right: Photo showing the extent of damage that happened to it because of the war in Lebanon (1975-1992).

The Inner Gate of Izzeddeen Hammam

The Inner Gate of Izzeddeen Hammam Showing the Holly Paschal Lamb (2016).

The Main Hall of Izzeddeen Hammam

The Main Hall of Izzeddeen Hammam.

Inner View of the Main Dome of Izzeddeen Hammam

Inner View of the Main Dome of Izzeddeen Hammam.

Interior View of a Dome above one Bathing Room at Izzeddeen Hammam

Interior View of a Dome above one Bathing Room at Izzeddeen Hammam.

A Bathing Room at Izzeddeen Hammam

A Bathing Room at Izzeddeen Hammam with Heating Pipes Runing in the Walls.

A Preparation Room at Izzeddeen Hammam

A Preparation Room at Izzeddeen Hammam.

The Water Boiler at Izzeddeen Hammam

The Water Boiler at Izzeddeen Hammam.

The dome of the Hammam
The Exterior View of the Main Dome of the Hammam.

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