Last update:
June 19, 2015
Ramadhan 2, 1436

Historical Houses in Tripoli

Tripoli > History > Monuments > Historical Houses

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Husein Defterdar House

The Iskandari House

Just before the end of the 7th Century H/13th Century CE, the Shafii judge of Tripoli, Ahmed Ben Abi Backer Ben Mansour Ben Attieh AlIskandari, also called Shamseddin AlIskandari, built a school next to the main gate of the Mansouri Great Mosque, Madrassa AlShamsiyah, and built this house for himself. Building of the house was along with the construction of the Mansouri Great Mosque. The historian Shamseddin AlZahabi, stayed at the house during his journey to Tripoli for learning (after 697 H/1289 CE). When the judge died, he was buried in it (707 H/1307 CE). The house is characterized by its wooden Manzara (belvedere or balcony-like structure). The Iskandari House is considered as the oldest Mameluke house in Lebanon.


The facade and the Manzara of the Iskandari House.
A closer view of the Manzara of the Iskandari House.

Mashrabiyah Window
Window located under the Manzara.

The Shami House

It is an example of early multi-storey appartments. It is present at the Haraj Souk, occupies 428 m2, and is composed of 3 storeys.

Related Links

The Dabbaghah District (video).


Dar Saadeh

Other Houses
Ottoman houses in Old Tripoli.

Traditional gates.


The Sultan Family Building (photo taken in the late 1990s).

The Sultan Family Building (photo taken in 2009 after renovation).

Ottoman architecture in Tell area.

French architecture in Masaref (Bank) Street (Tell District).

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